Baby Boomer Retirement Planning, Part 1: The Challenge Ahead

By Sindy Berkowitz

Earlier this year, the Insured Retirement Institute released its annual study covering the Baby Boomer generation and its financial preparedness for retirement. Since the IRI’s first publication in 2011, the number of Americans over the age of 65 has increased over 18 percent. Yet, despite the steady incline of retired Baby Boomers, this year’s study demonstrates that this generation still has yet to find answers to some of the greatest challenges facing Americans in retirement today. In fact, only 23 percent believe they have enough saved to last their entire retirement.

This series will dive deeper into the state of Baby Boomer retirement planning, providing insights into the unique challenges ahead for the average American retiree. In addition, we will offer several ways to help you start putting your planning on the right track to ensure that you and your loved ones can maintain the quality of life you’ve worked so hard to achieve.

In Part 1, we will take a closer look at some of the biggest challenges you’ve got to address in order to ensure that your wealth lasts a lifetime.

Inflation: The cost of everything, from a gallon of milk to real estate, is subject to inflation. On a yearly basis, you might not notice the incremental price increases, but over time, inflation will degrade your buying power. As funding a retirement account is a long-term savings strategy, you must factor inflation into your planning.

Market fluctuations: Investments tethered to the stock market can offer a strong return on investment, but they can also leave you more exposed to risk.  If the markets enter a period of decline as you reach retirement age, you may be forced to find other means to recover.

Medical expenses: Americans are, fortunately, living longer than ever. But that also means that retirees will likely have more medical expenses to account for as well. According to the IRI’s 2017 report, 82 percent of Baby Boomers underestimate the cost of medical expenses to come.

Income gap: Pension participation is not as common as it used to be, and Social Security will only account for a portion of the paycheck you received during your working days. Many Americans don’t realize that assured income streams may be lower than the monthly expenses they’ll see in retirement, setting them up for a gap in wages that must be recovered to maintain their lifestyle.

At The Milford Bank, we’ve helped countless individuals—from their first savings account, to retirement planning, and everything in between. We are ready to work with you to craft a saving strategy that will help you navigated the uncharted waters of retirement.

Be sure to check back next time for Part 2 of this series, when we’ll be discussing some strategies to help you avoid the challenges you face in retirement planning. You can also learn more by checking out our Online Learning Center here.

Talking Dollars, Cents and Sense about Flu Season

By Lynda Mason

Living in New England, Milford and Stratford residents always have something special to look forward to at this time of year. We’ve got brilliant foliage in the Fall and picturesque, snowy landscapes in Winter. But there’s one seasonal event that nobody in New England is looking forward to: flu season.

While most of us consider the flu to be a minor inconvenience, the truth is that this seasonal contagion has a significant part to play for just about every family in the country.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, up to 20 percent of the U.S. population contracts influenza on an annual basis. So even if you’ve managed to steer clear, the chances are good that someone in your home will catch it—and it could cost you much more than a few boxes of tissues.

The CDC reports that flu cases cost $10.4 billion a year in direct medical expenses and $16.3 billion in lost earnings. Children, meanwhile, will miss 32 million days of school each year due to the flu.

Further, the flu leads to tens of thousands of hospitalizations, and worst of all, thousands of deaths caused by flu-like symptoms.

Looking at these figures makes it clear just how devastating the toll of influenza can be. Fortunately, there are plenty of simple steps you can take to ensure that you don’t contract, or spread, the flu this season.

Review the CDC’s updated influenza guidelines: Every year brings a new strain of influenza. This year is expected to be more virulent than the 2016 version, so it is important to stay informed. You can check out the CDC’s 2017-2018 flu season guide here.

Avoid doctor’s offices and hospitals: As a contagious virus, doctors’ offices and hospitals are natural vectors for the flu. There are good odds of encountering someone with the flu, or passing it to others, if you go to these facilities. For that reason, many individuals opt to act preemptively and get flu shots at retail pharmacies before they get sick. If you think you may have the flu, check with your PCP about their telehealth services so that a doctor can diagnose you over a videoconference instead.

Of course, every individual has different needs when it comes to flu shots, and you should consult with your physician to first see if it is the right decision for you or your family.

Practice good health habits: The flu, like any other germ, cannot thrive in a sterile environment. While the CDC does state that flu shots are the single most effective way to prevent flu, it also names a number of health-conscious choices you can make that will help you avoid contracting the virus. This includes: washing your hands, avoiding touching your eyes, nose or mouth, drinking lots of fluids, getting lots of sleep and eating nutritious meals.

At The Milford Bank, we believe that physical health and financial health go hand in hand. Taking care of your body will help you take care of your finances, so when it comes to flu season, we want to make sure our customers don’t end up spending the next few months in bed with a thermometer under their tongue and a ball of tissues in hand. To learn more ways to stay in good shape—both physically and financially—check out our Online Learning Center here.

There’s No Reason to Be Scared Over Record Halloween Spending

By Celeste Lohrenz

It’s not uncommon to stress when it comes to holiday spending. We’ve all been there, with a list of presents in one hand and a suddenly shrinking wallet in the other. But it usually takes an entire season of spending until we reach our tipping point racing around for a hot-ticket item on Christmas Eve.

This year, however, consumers may start feeling the pinch a little earlier this season, as the National Retail Federation reports that Halloween spending is expected to hit a record—$9.1 billion—this year.

But that doesn’t mean you have to get spooked into record-setting spending yourself. In fact, there are plenty of ways that you can make sure to keep your costs down without sacrificing the spirit of Halloween.

Let’s break down some of the figures from the National Retail Federation’s report to show how you may be able to save a few dollars yourself.

Costumes: The NRF reports that costumes are the highest priced item on the Halloween shopping list. The average man will spend $96 on a costume, while women will spend $77. Costume shops will often have prepackaged costumes ready to go, but they will come at a premium. But if you have a  knack for arts and crafts, you may be able to build your own costume by shopping at discount retailers, thrift stores or pawn shops instead.

Candy: 95 percent of consumers who responded to the NRF study planned to purchase candy for Halloween, either to pass out to children or for a Halloween party. If you wait until the last minute, you may be stuck paying higher prices. If you act early, though, you may be able to shop around for the best bulk purchase.

Decorations: Thinking of putting a scare into trick-or-treaters with an elaborate decorative lawnscape this Halloween? Just remember that in some cases, you’re not just paying for the decorations. Decorations that use electricity—especially the inflatable ones for your yard—will end up costing you an additional sum beyond what you pay at checkout. You just won’t see it until your November utility bill arrives. Be careful with your decorations. Look for solar options when possible, and if you do need to plug something in, be sure to unplug it at the end of each night. Even if you turn the power off, anything that is still plugged in will use electricity.

Be sure to check back with us frequently this holiday season, as we’ll be offering advice to help you navigate your way right into the New Year. You can also learn more about managing your finances at our Online Learning Center here.

 

Money Talks—How You Should, and Shouldn’t, Discuss Your Finances

By Pat White

There are few things in life more uncomfortable than talking about finances. In fact, people are even seven times more likely to discuss their love life with a total stranger than they are their salary. Despite the difficulties we have with communicating about our money, it is nonetheless important to do so.

If you have children, it is imperative that they learn early how to respect and recognize the value of a dollar. Whether they just opened their first checking account or are saving up to buy a car, it’s up to you to guide them. The lessons you impart onto your children now will forge an indelible mark on their financial decision making processes for years to come.

Couples might find this topic a little more difficult. Each partner comes in with habits and strategies of their own already in place. In these cases, it isn’t necessarily a matter of educating the other partner, as with children. Instead, it’s a matter of having open and honest communications about where you stand now, where you want to end up, and how you’ll get there as a couple. This is as true for a middle-aged couple planning for retirement as it is for a couple that has just started dating.

Of course, when having these conversations, you should be mindful of the fact that it can be a touchy subject. In order to make sure the conversation is a productive one, consider the following tips on how you should, and shouldn’t talk about money.

Point the finger at yourself: In a partnership, both parties need to agree to a strategy—and stick to it. But what do you do when your partner strays from the plan? You wouldn’t necessarily be wrong to call their attention to it. But we’ve all made mistakes, and they might remind you of that fact. Such conversations can quickly escalate into finger-pointing, justification and hurt feelings. Instead, turn the attention onto yourself. Mention to them how you intend to curb your own overspending, or give an example of how you overcame a similar obstacle in the past. They’ll likely get the point without the feeling of being under attack.

Make it about the math: Numbers don’t lie. They’re objective, rational and provable. So why do difficult conversations about money quickly get overtaken by emotion? It’s when we stray from the numbers that our passion can get the better of us. When talking about money be sure to set aside any other grievances you may harbor and simply stick to the facts at hand.

Finding the middle ground: Currency only works because we all accept the value of money as a society. But that doesn’t exactly mean that everyone values money in the same way either. Some are happy to watch their savings account grow, while others would rather spend their paycheck right away. As such, you can’t assume to have all the answers when talking finances with others.  Appreciate their perspective as you’d hope they would do for you, and always be ready to find a compromise that meets the needs of you and your partner, family or business.

Talk in percentages: Calling attention to your finances can make those in different economic circumstances uncomfortable. In some social circles, it’s even considered a faux pas. In order to have an honest conversation without calling attention to your actual worth, speak in percentages. Rather than saying you’ll invest $20,000 into a Mutual Fund, say that you’re investing 20 percent of your assets instead. It keeps the conversation vague enough to be respectful, while open enough to be engaging and honest.

Of course, at The Milford Bank it’s our job to talk finances. We’ve heard it all before and are always ready to listen. If you’re ready to talk finances, stop by an office location in Milford or Stratford today. You can also find more valuable resources at our Online Learning Center.