Tips for Cutting Costs and Better Saving This Year

By Lynda Mason

The dawn of a new year is always exciting.  For one thing, it offers a fresh opportunity to break bad habits and think about new ways to make our own lives better.  Some people decide to eat healthier or visit the gym more often.  Others decide to spend more time with loved ones, or make an effort to contribute to the community.  But, if there’s one change we all can benefit from, it’s saving a little more.

Inflation, rising gas prices, and supply chain hold-ups are driving up costs across the board, making it harder for regular people to pay for everyday goods and services.  In fact, consumer prices are higher than they have been in 40 years.  Reducing spending and putting more into your savings can help balance these challenges, and can help you maintain financial stability in the coming months and years.

While certain spending is necessary, luckily, there are a number of simple solutions to help reduce expenses and build up your savings, without making major lifestyle changes or requiring significant effort.  Here are a few useful tips for cutting costs in 2022, ensuring your financial goals aren’t thrown off as a result of the current economic climate.

Monitor your subscriptions

Subscription services are incredibly popular, but there may be a few, or even several, you can cancel.  Whether it’s Netflix, Amazon Prime, Blue Apron, Spotify, or even magazines, there are subscription services for virtually every need.  Although many of these services are fairly affordable on their own, it’s easy to forget about how many subscriptions you have and how quickly they can add up in your monthly expenses.  Some people have so many subscriptions they forget about some of them altogether, leading them to waste money on services they don’t use.  Cancelling unused or rarely used subscriptions is one of the quickest ways to cut costs.  If you subscribe to multiple similar services, consider whether you actually use and need both or all of them.  Additionally, sharing services with family is a great way to reduce monthly costs.  Many services have individual and family plans that allow you to save on the overall expense.  Many also offer savings if you pay up-front for the year.  If you can afford that one-time larger payment, it’s a way to reduce your monthly spending even more.

Keep an eye out for deals

After two years of stale growth, many businesses are attempting to draw in new customers by offering specials and sales.  While mail has historically been a primary source for receiving coupons or promotional items, digital resources like social media and email have become more popular and many retailers have shifted to digital coupons.  It’s easy to disregard many advertising campaigns as nuisances but, there can be many great deals out there for products or services you purchase on a regular basis.  Be aware of promotions your favorite businesses are running; you may be able to find great deals to support your budget.

Free digital resources

Almost everyone has access to a smart phone or a computer, which means anyone can take advantage of a wide range of digital resources to make better financial decisions.  For instance, as gas prices rise, many people will go out of their way to find the lowest price when they need to fill up.  Apps like GasBuddy and Waze make it easy to determine which stations offer the lowest prices, without a fee.  In fact, app stores are flooded with price-checking resources to help you save on everyday goods.  Consider checking them out.   There are also digital savings apps, like Plinqit, which can help you stick to your saving goals.  The Milford Bank has partnered with Plinqit to make it simple.

Track Your Spending Habits

Cash used to be king, but digital payments are quickly becoming the norm.  They can also provide greater visibility into your spending habits (and debit/credit cards can provide a layer of purchase protection cash can’t).  Using your online banking account, you can consolidate your weekly and monthly purchases to analyze how much you’re spending and on what.   If you find you’re spending too much on certain items, you can consider cutting or reducing them from your budget to see how much can be added to your savings.  Analyzing your purchasing habits is a great way to make smarter spending decisions, and can keep you on the right path for financial stability.  There are also plenty of online tools for tracking your weekly or monthly spending.  You can also use a spreadsheet.  Regardless of how you do it, tracking you spending is a great step in setting and sticking to a reasonable budget that will help you save.

It’s common for people to make New Year’s resolutions, but incredibly rare for them to follow through for the entire year.  But nothing good comes easily and success requires work and dedication to see positive results.  Cutting unnecessary spending may seem easy, but it should be a priority.  Plus, once you’ve done it, you may be surprised at how little you miss those things you’ve cut out.  You’ll also be pleasantly surprised at how quickly small reductions in spending can add up.  Even if you think you’re comfortable with your monthly spending, saving more may help you fund larger expenses, like vacations, college tuition, home improvement projects, and more.  Regardless of what you are saving for, consider these tips to help make it a little easier.  And if you need advice, your local bank’s specialists are always happy to offer their advice.

Six Tips for Using P2P Payment Apps

By Dave Wall

In today’s digital world, most of what we do is somehow attached to our smartphones.  From our communication and social media to shopping and dining, you probably use a mobile app to get things done.  That includes banking.  Most of your banking features are available on right in the palm of your hand, including the ability to send money instantly.

In a world where many of us pay for just about everything with mobile apps and credit cards, the one thing that isn’t quite as easy as making an online purchase is sending money – at least not until money transfer apps like Zelle launched.  Zelle is one of several popular apps that can be attached to your bank account to send money to anyone you know instantly.

Whether it’s to easily split a lunch bill with friends, pay for your fantasy sports league, reimburse your Mom for a gift, pay your sitter, or any other reason, Zelle makes it as simple as handing cash over.  The difference is you don’t have to worry about carrying cash and you can do it at any time using your bank’s mobile app.  The only qualification is you and the other party both need to have Zelle connected to your bank accounts.

But, while P2P payment apps are very convenient, there are a few best practices you should follow to keep your money safe.

Use it like cash

Even though it’s a digital banking tool, think of Zelle like using cash.  If you have $50 in your pocket, once you spend it, it’s gone.  Once you send a payment through an app, you can’t cancel it.  It’s like handing cash to someone – once it’s gone, it’s gone.

Only send to people you know and trust

Because you can’t cancel payments once they have been made, make sure you know who you’re sending money to and why, and make sure you are sending to the correct Zelle user.  If you’re not sure, confirm with whomever you’re sending to.  The instantaneous nature of these payments is one of their best features, but they can also work against you if you’re not careful.

Make sure you send money to the right person

Once you send, the money is gone, so you want to make sure you are sending to the right person.  Many account names are very similar.  It’s good practice to confirm the accounts you’re sending money to so your payment doesn’t end up in the wrong hands, and you have to send more to then get it to the right person.

Know your app policies

Some apps charge fees for certain kinds of transactions.  Some charge for sending money using a credit card.  Some charge for transferring money back into your bank account (Zelle does not).  Regardless of what app(s) you are using, make sure you are aware of any fees you may be responsible for before you start sending or receiving money.  Carefully reading the terms of service is a good place to start.

Beware of scams

Make sure you know what you are getting when you use payment apps.  Scammers often try to get paid using apps because it’s very difficult for you to get funds back once they are sent.  If you see a deal that seems too good to be true, there’s a good chance it is.  Also understand that reputable sellers will offer multiple payment options.

Use available security features

Remember that while you should spend money through payment apps like cash, they aren’t quite the same because they require access to your financial information.  Make sure you are using the most recent version of your app, which should have the most up-to-date security updates.  Also look at what security features you can enable on your app and enable those that give you the highest level of security.

Following these simple guidelines will help you protect your savings, while allowing you to enjoy the ease of P2P payments, so you can send money to anyone you know, for any reason, instantly.

Are You a Renter Looking to Become a Homeowner?

By Paul Mulligan, SVP, Retail Lending

Last year, while many businesses and industries suffered, the real estate market in Connecticut had a phenomenal year, with a 17% increase in home purchases.  The 38,641 single-family homes bought was the highest in the state in 15 years.  One factor certainly was the fact that the number of people moving into Connecticut in 2020 was more than double what the state enjoyed during 2019.

One of the byproducts of the trend was an increase in home prices, which also grew. As a result, many people may feel they are being priced out of the home market.  Renters, in particular, are feeling less confident that they will be able to buy homes.  Just over a third of current renters say they are “not very confident” or “not confident at all” in their ability to buy a home.  The majority say their lack of confidence comes from home prices being too high or an inability to afford a down payment.

But, that shouldn’t mean renters should stop thinking about buying a home.   There are many benefits to owning, including:

  • Freedom to renovate/decorate
  • Building equity
  • Potential tax benefits
  • Value could increase over time
  • Stability of ownership
  • Predictable monthly loan payment (with a fixed-rate mortgage)

There are also many variables to consider when buying a home; including location, size and type of home, features, and of course, cost.  If you’re ready to buy a home – or even if you’re just starting to consider it – one of the first things you may want to consider is your priorities?  That includes what are the must have, nice-to-have, and unnecessary features.  If you’re willing to add flexibility to your process, you should enjoy greater home selection opportunities.

In addition, your local community bank may be able to offer you better mortgage terms that may make it easier for you to get out of paying someone else for your living space and start building equity in your own home.  For instance, The Milford Bank offers highly competitive rates with no-cost lock-in, low down payment options, free prequalification to make your home shopping experience easier, decisions made locally by a bank with a long history of serving the local community, and mortgage professionals that focus on your individual needs as a local customer.

In addition, if you’re a renter looking for your first home, The Milford Bank offers a First-Time Homebuyer program within Milford, Stratford, West haven, and Orange; that includes a rate reduction from the standard rate, application fee refund on closing, and low down payment options. The Milford Bank also offers a special rate for single family dwelling purchases, regardless of location throughout the state of CT.

You may also want to consider current versus future plans.  When looking at homes and talking to your bank, consider how you might be able to expand a potential home in the future to meet additional needs or to add some of the nice-to-have features that might not be feasible initially.  You may even be able to use the equity you build in your home over the years to take out a home equity loan or line of credit to fund home improvement projects.  Alternatively, The Milford Bank offers a construction-to-permanent one closing loan option, which includes the option of a fixed rate and an interest only period of up to 12 months during the construction phase.

The bottom line is, if you are looking to buy a home – whether you’re tired of paying a monthly rent to a landlord or association or you simply want the freedom and convenience of owning your own home – don’t let your lack of confidence keep you from achieving your dream.  Talk to The Milford Bank’s local mortgage specialists, who can provide you with the information and assistance you need to make a truly informed decision to assist you in purchasing a home that fits your needs and budget.

Four Ways to Pay Off Your Student Debt Faster

By Celeste Lohrenz

Did you know that the average student loan payment is $393? That’s a major expense in and of itself — but as most borrowers know, the real cost of student debt is much higher than their monthly bill.

The burden of student debt can hold borrowers back from major life events and financial goals, including buying a home, opening a retirement fund, going back to school, and even getting married and starting a family. And because it takes the average borrower 20 years to pay it off, student debt can negatively impact borrowers for decades.

With so much at stake, you may find yourself wishing you could pick up the pace on your payoff. Luckily, The Milford Bank offers FutureFuel.io as a value-added service to help you manage and repay your student loan debt faster and smarter.

Here are four ways you can pay off your student debt faster with FutureFuel.io:

Make extra payments

It may sound like a no-brainer, but making extra payments can get you on the fast track to a student debt-free future in more ways than one. That’s because the lower your overall student loan balance, the less you’ll pay in interest over time. Depending on your specific situation, it may make sense to budget to pay more than your required minimum payment amount each month, or use any unexpected extra cash to give yourself a boost. If your workplace offers a student debt repayment employee benefit, taking advantage of their contribution can help you get ahead faster, too.

Tip: Auto-Crush from FutureFuel.io makes it easy to send one-time or monthly recurring payments to any or all of your student loans from one central dashboard.

Turn spare change from everyday purchases into student loan contributions

Pennies and dimes can add up to a big impact fast thanks to Round Up from FutureFuel.io. Simply connect your debit or credit card, then Round Up will go to work rounding your purchases up to the nearest dollar and stashing the spare change. At the end of the month, those funds will be sent as an extra student debt contribution.

Convert cash back rewards into student loan payments

Love online shopping? Take your purchases the extra mile by activating Giveback by FutureFuel.io. Giveback collects cash back rewards from hundreds of your favorite online merchants and sends them to your student loan debt.

Switch to an income-driven repayment plan

The Department of Education offers four different income-driven repayment (IDR) plans for federal student loans. While these won’t technically help you pay off your student debt faster, they can help you get rid of it faster. That’s because IDR plans forgive any remaining debt after a set period of time (20 or 25 years, depending on the plan), and can make your monthly payments more affordable in the meantime.

Tip: FutureFuel.io’s Reassess tool can help you check your eligibility for, compare, and apply for federal income-driven repayment plans in a matter of minutes.

Do You Plinqit?

By Celeste Lohrenz

We all know we should be saving money.  From the time we got our first summer jobs during high school, our parent’s almost certainly tried to convince us to put most of it in the bank.  Even though we know we should be saving, most of us probably didn’t do it as well then, and probably aren’t doing it as well as we should or would like to now.

Almost 60% of Americans have less than $6,000 saved (42% have less than $1,000).  Only 14% of people under 54 see retirement savings as a priority, even though we should be saving 10-17% of our income in order to retire at our current standard of living – that’s if we start saving at the age of 25.

Without a plan for saving consistently, it’s hard to cover any larger expenses, including emergencies, college tuition, weddings, a new home, vacation, and many other things.  It’s important to start saving early for all of these things so that when they happen, you’re prepared.

One of the best things you can do is automate your savings.  For your retirement account, you can have contributions deducted from your paycheck and deposited into your account.  For other saving needs, have you considered Plinqit?

Plinqit is a digital savings tool offered by The Milford Bank and HT Mobile Apps to make saving easier and more fun.  You simply set up your Plinqit account and define specific savings goals.  You can even set up five different goals, so you can track progress towards each individual target separately.  Your Plinqit account is connected to your checking account, so once the saving goal is set up, you don’t have to do anything other than watch it grow.

In addition, you can earn small bonuses by watching videos or reading articles designed to help increase your financial education, so you you’ll learn more about money while earning, too.  You can also earn bonuses by reaching your savings goals and referring others to use Plinqit.

Plinqit is free to use, and you can download a mobile app to your Apple or Android device to manage your account easily.

Most importantly, though, using an automated tool can help you save more effectively without having to remember to add to a separate account manually.  Once you set it up, it just happens and your vacation, emergency, or other savings will grow.

If you have questions about Plinqit, savings accounts, or any other financial needs, our banking experts are here to help.

Student Loans 101

by Jorge Santiago

College is expensive. In the 2020-2021 academic year, the average private college’s tuition and fees was $35,087; public colleges averaged $21,184 for out-of-state students and $9,687 for in-state students. Multiply that by at least four years, and the total cost of a degree is one very few students — or their families — can afford out-of-pocket.

That’s where student loans come in. Student loans create opportunities for students who might not otherwise be able to afford their education, which can in turn lead to more stable, gainful, and fulfilling employment.

But student loans are just that — loans that must eventually be paid back. If you’re one of the 47.9 million Americans carrying a combined $1.71 trillion in student debt, you probably already know that repayment can be a strain. And if you’re considering applying for college loans, you should understand your options before taking on student debt.

So let’s get back to the basics. Here are four questions everyone with student debt — or considering taking out student loans in the future — should know how to answer:

What types of student loans are available?

Types of federal student loans

As their name suggests, federal student loans are offered through the federal government via the Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA). Three different types of federal student loans are available: Direct Subsidized, Direct Unsubsidized, and Direct PLUS.

  • Direct Subsidized Loans are available for undergraduate students with financial need (the difference between your school’s cost of attendance and your household’s expected contribution). Interest rates are fixed for life when the loan is first disbursed and are generally lower.
  • Direct Unsubsidized Loans are available for both undergraduate and graduate students, regardless of financial need. Interest rates are fixed for life when the loan is first disbursed and are generally higher.
  • Direct PLUS Loans are available to parents financing their child’s education, and to graduate or professional students funding their own education. The application process requires a credit check, but borrowers with low credit scores can still qualify if they have an endorser or can document extenuating circumstances. Interest rates are fixed for life when the loan is first disbursed and are generally the highest rate compared to other federal student loans.

Types of private student loans

Private student loans are offered through financial institutions like banks and credit unions. The terms of private student loans are controlled by the lender, so there are lots of different options available. Private loans often entail higher interest rates and stricter eligibility criteria, but they can be a helpful tool for borrowers who have already maxed out their federal aid.

 

How does student loan repayment work?

Federal student loan repayment

If you have federal Direct Unsubsidized or Direct Subsidized Loans, your loans will be in deferment while you’re still in school and for six months after you graduate or withdraw. After this grace period ends, you’ll be responsible for making monthly payments through your loan servicer (FSA will assign your servicer — a third-party company that manages student loan billing — after your first loan is disbursed).

Direct PLUS Loan borrowers can expect a very similar process, with the exception that you must request deferment through FSA or your student loan servicer. Otherwise, you’ll have to start making payments while you are or your child is still in school.

All federal student loan borrowers will have the opportunity to select a repayment plan when they first start making payments and adjust their repayment plan later on. There are eight different federal student loan repayment plans available, including income-driven repayment plans, which cap monthly payments to a manageable percentage of your discretionary income.

Private student loan repayment

Private student loan repayment varies based on your lender’s terms. Some require payments while you’re still in school or immediately after graduating, some manage repayment through a servicer or in-house, and repayment plans vary. If you’re considering private student loans, be sure you understand the lender’s repayment policies.

Can I get my student debt cancelled, paused, or forgiven?

If you have private student loans, your options for getting your loans cancelled, paused, or forgiven are limited.

But if you have federal student loans, it’s possible — provided you meet certain eligibility requirements.

You may be eligible to have your federal student loans partially or totally cancelled if:

  • Your school closed while you were a student or shortly after you withdrew or graduated
  • You develop a total and permanent disability
  • You were defrauded by your school
  • You declare bankruptcy

You may be eligible to have your student loans paused if you apply for and are granted temporary deferment. You might qualify for deferment if:

  • You’re enrolled in a graduate fellowship
  • You’re undergoing cancer treatment
  • You’re serving in the Peace Corps
  • You’re on active military duty
  • You’re receiving welfare assistance
  • You work full-time but earn 150% below the poverty line

You may be eligible to have your student loans forgiven through special forgiveness programs if:

  • You’re a teacher
  • You work at a nonprofit organization
  • You work for a federal, state, local, or tribal government agency
  • You’ve been on an income-driven repayment plan for at least 20-25 years

How can The Milford Bank help me manage my student loans?

When it comes to student debt, you don’t have to go it alone. The Milford Bank is excited to launch a new partnership to give our customers tools that make managing their student loans easier than ever before. Stay tuned for an announcement soon!

How to Recognize Scam Calls and Keep Your Money Safe

By Tina Mason

On any given day, you probably get phone calls from numbers you don’t know.  Those dreaded spam calls continue to become more frequent and the total number grew by 18% globally last year.  In the U.S. that growth was even more significant, with Americans receiving an average of 28 spam calls a month (up from 18 a year earlier).

What’s worse is the situation is expanding.  What was once limited mostly to landlines has expanded to mobile phones.  In fact, 46% of Americans said they get spam calls on their cell phones every day in February of this year.

The problem is these calls aren’t just a nuisance; many are from scammers trying to con people into giving up their money.  Unfortunately, it’s working – Americans lost nearly $20 billion due to phone scams in 2020.

The good news is you can avoid falling victim by staying informed about the latest scams (the FTC regularly updates its site with common scams), by knowing how to identify them, and by simply following some best practices.

Auto warranty scams – This one has been going on for years.  It usually starts with a pleasant recorded voice introducing him- or herself and claiming to be from the “Vehicle Service Department” or something similar.  The recording continues to explain that your vehicle warranty is about to expire unless you extend it with them immediately.  They might even have specific information about your vehicle they have obtained through any number of ways.  The warranty these scammers are offering is usually a service contract of some kind that could actually cost you more than you would pay for vehicle maintenance and repairs.

Pyramid sales schemes – These may seem like legitimate business opportunities selling products from your home.  But when you look at them carefully, you’ll see your compensation is based on how many new sales people you recruit, not how much product you sell.  In addition, you will typically be required to buy a certain amount of product, even if you already have enough inventory on hand.  Ultimately, you’re more likely to lose time and money than make a living.

COVID-19 scams – There are several kinds of scams trying to leverage the coronavirus pandemic.  Some try to sell you a vaccine.  If you haven’t yet been fully vaccinated, remember that the COVID-19 vaccine is being administered for free.  You can find a local vaccination site here.  Another scam involves scammers posing as FEMA workers reaching out to cover costs associated with family members that may have died due to COVID-19.  Unless you have already registered with FEMA for their funeral assistance program, they will not reach out to you.  If you get a call or email from someone claiming to be with a government agency, it’s most likely to be a scam you don’t want to get involved with.  And no, your social security number will not be suspended – yet another government-related scam that has been around for a long time.

Utility scams – Have you gotten a call from someone claiming to be with your electric, water, or gas company, claiming your service is going to be cut off unless you make payment immediately?  Again, almost certainly a scam.  Your actual utility companies may threaten to cut you off if you are delinquent on your bills, but they will send notifications – you can also verify your account through their website if you’re not sure.  Or, simply call them if you think you may have missed a payment – in which case you may have to pay a late fee, but they probably won’t threaten to cut off your service yet.

Payment options – One of the things to note is most scammers don’t use the normal payment methods when they try to get you to pay them.  Having you send a check or pay online on your oil company’s site doesn’t get them any money.  They will often ask you to use Western Union of other money transfer services, or some ask you to add money to a reloadable gift card.  More tech-savvy scammers may also want you to pay with cryptocurrency.  They use these methods because they are mostly untraceable making it almost impossible to recover the money.

The bottom line is this: Legitimate businesses will identify themselves clearly and won’t threaten you on the phone.  Most will also work with you to arrange payment plans if you’re experiencing difficulty.

If an offer seems too good to be true – like winning a large cash award from a drawing you didn’t enter, or a get-rich-quick job offer – it probably is.  Never agree to anything before you have done your research.  In fact, many people today don’t even answer phone calls from numbers they don’t know.  That way, they can just delete the phony voice mail messages and, if they think it could possibly be real, can look up the correct phone number (never call back a number given on a voice message you think could be fraudulent) and call the bank, store, service provider, government agency, or whoever the caller claimed to be with.

The same goes for emails.  Don’t click on links, don’t call numbers on emails because they could be fake, and assume offers are fraudulent unless they come from one of your trusted relationships.  Even then, take care to look carefully at email addresses, names, other personal details, as well as grammar and spelling.  Most fraudulent of phishing emails have mistakes in them that should raise a red flag.

Again, if you have any uncertainty, look up phone numbers yourself and make a few phone calls to verify the legitimacy of any call or email you get.  It may take a few extra minutes, but that small effort could keep you, your family, and your money safe.

But, if you make a mistake and think you have fallen victim to a scam, the first thing you should do is contact your bank so they can help you with your bank accounts and make sure your funds aren’t accessible to scammers.

Celebrating Home Owners: Are You Ready to Buy?

June is National Homeownership Month, celebrating a key part of what many people see as part of their life dreams.  And why not?  Home ownership can be a great investment with many benefits.

Long term cost savings – By paying your monthly mortgage, you are creating your own nest egg, instead of paying off someone else’s mortgage or generating revenue for them.  In many cases, mortgage payments, especially for first-time buyers, can be very close to or even lower than monthly rent.

Equity – As you pay down your mortgage, you build equity in your home, increasing your net worth and your future ability to obtain home equity loans for other expenses, including home improvements (which can further increase the value of your investment).

Improving credit – As long as you make your monthly payments on time, you can improve your credit rating, making it easier to secure other loans for future expenses.

It’s yours – When you own property, the decision on how to use it is yours, not your landlord’s.  You can decide how to decorate, renovate, add on to create more living and entertaining space, and generally use your property however you want.  The financial benefits are great, but this may be the greatest benefit of all.

Of course, if you’re a first-time home buyer, you’ve got a lot to think about, including securing a mortgage, which can be an uncertain prospect.  But, working with the right bank can make it a much easier and satisfying process – especially those with special first-time buyer programs.  The Milford Bank offers a program that includes a reduced interest rate, application fee refund, pre-qualification certificates, and low down-payment options, which take the hassle out of buying your first home.

In addition to financing, you have many other things to think about when buying a home – especially for the first time.  This includes location, school system, style, property size, and of course home features.

To help you consider what is most important to you, here’s a list of the most commonly desired features by home buyers today.  Each of these features was listed by at least 80% of people as being either a must-have or desirable feature.

  • Laundry room
  • Exterior lighting
  • Ceiling fan(s)
  • Energy efficient windows
  • Patio
  • Double kitchen sink
  • Walk-in pantry
  • Front porch
  • Energy efficient appliances
  • Hardwood floors
  • Full bath on main level
  • Energy efficient lighting

As you get start with the home buying process, make sure you’re buying a home that you’ll be happy with.  It’s not a bad idea to think about the future and your ability to renovate or add on.  You’ll have question, naturally, especially when it comes to the mortgage.  Don’t hesitate to call on our mortgage specialists to answer them so you have an enjoyable experience.

Why Small Businesses and Community Banks are a Perfect Match

By John Darin

May is Small Business Month, celebrating the importance of small businesses to our national and local economies.  Small business owners and their entrepreneurial spirit are a cornerstone of our economy and our local communities.  In Connecticut, they comprise 97% of business and employ half of the state’s workforce.

Small Business Month also recognizes that small businesses have unique needs.  Every business needs a bank and there are certainly several national brands to choose from.  But, just as there are many options for your personal banking, there are local alternatives that may be beneficial for small businesses.

Community banks were instrumental in helping small businesses make it through the COVID-19 pandemic.  Early during the pandemic, when the first round of Paycheck Protection Funding was exhausted, the U.S. Small Business Administration approved more than 1.6 million loans to support small businesses, totaling more than $300 billion.  About 60% of those loans were handled by community banks.

Like small business, community banks are important to the success of local communities and can offer benefits that large national brands can’t.

Personalized service –  When you go into or call a local bank, you’re getting attention from the same people every time – not a call center agent located across the country.  You’ll save time because your bankers know you and your business, creating deeper bonds because they see your business as a personal relationship, not an account number.  As a result, they will go the extra mile to give you personalized attention.

Faster action – Time is money.  As a business owner, getting answers from your bank quickly is important.  Because community banks aren’t spread across the country, their decision-making process is often simpler and faster because it happens locally.

Lower fees – Many community banks offer lower fees or better terms and interest rates than their national counterparts.  For small businesses, every dollar saved or earned makes a difference.

Local for local – Local banks are proud of their local communities and tend to be very active in local activities.  They know the local business and support various organizations and events that support the local economy and benefit both businesses and residents.  This helps build their communities and create a better place to live and work, which help attract new residents and businesses.  As a small business, the local community is important to your success, and community banks play a big role.

Know your customer – Every business is unique.  Personal attention combined with local intimacy also gives community banks a chance to really know their customers and their business banking needs.  As a result, they are able to provide a higher level of care and service that caters to each individual business.  That knowledge can also play into your bank’s decision-making because they are able to factor in what they know about your business, you as the business owner, and the local community.  It becomes about more than just entering data into a formula.

Small Business knowledge – Community banks understand small businesses.  Remember that they are, in fact, small businesses just like you, so they have an inherent first-hand knowledge of what it takes to succeed as a small business.  That knowledge translates into a service mentality designed to help small businesses succeed, rather than trying to force them into cookie-cutter approach designed for large enterprises.

Business services – Community banks have built service portfolios to meet your business needs. They aren’t a one-trick pony and offer a variety of business banking services.  From commercial loans and business lines of credit to retirement and employee benefits management to online banking and much more, don’t think that just because they are smaller, your community bank isn’t well-equipped to serve your business needs.

As a small business, you know you have specific banking needs.  You also know the large national brands aren’t as agile or flexible when it comes to meeting your needs – they can’t be.  So, when you think about your financial needs, remember there are local alternatives to those big brands that can be a much better fit for you.  Find out exactly how The Milford Bank can help your business by getting to know one of our local professionals today to learn how they can help make running your business a lot easier.

Get Rid of Your Old Electronics Safely

Recycling is an important part of our daily lives.  In fact, it’s the law, and there is a list of items that are designated for recycling only in CT and may not be placed in the garbage.  There are many reasons, but among the biggest is the fact that landfills are filling up and could be gone within the next two decades.  There are also environmental hazards associated with landfills when toxic chemicals leak into the soil and air when items aren’t disposed of properly.

Using recycled materials avoids environmental damage from mining, drilling, and harvesting trees. E-recycling, in particular, has become increasingly important – and a major problem.  Often, as people replace old electronics and simply throw their old ones away.  In 2019, the U.S. created almost 7 tons of e-waste (that’s 46 pounds per person), but recycled a mere 15%.  The value of the raw materials in that e-waste is about $7.5 billion.

According to the EPA, recycling 1 million laptops saves enough energy to power more than 3,600 homes for a year.  Recycling also creates jobs.  It’s estimated that, for every landfill job, there are 35 jobs in recycling processing and recycling-based manufacturing.  So, the more we recycle, the more jobs we can create.

One of the problems is people don’t always know where or how to recycle their old electronics.

Every year, as part of its ongoing commitment to the community, The Milford Bank promotes recycling with its Shred & Recycle Days.  The event gives residents an opportunity to easily and safely discard their old e-waste and documents.

The next Shred & Recycle Day is coming soon, from 9:00am to noon (or until the trucks are filled) on Saturday, May 8, 2021, at The Milford Bank location at 295 Boston Post Rd, Milford.